Jack White’s new music video “High Ball Stepper” is awesome for both the ears and the eyes.

cjohnstonbioart:

Helicoprion and Nautiloids
Sharks have existed for millions of years. They are extremely important to their local ecosystems as they help to keep fish populations in check. Today there are approximately 400 known species of sharks. Sadly, many species of sharks are facing the threat of extinction due to overfishing. For more information about sharks, their history, and conservation efforts to save them, check out: http://www.sharksavers.org/en/home/

Created with 3ds Max, ZBrush, After Effects, and Photoshop.


This shark looks like he just can’t handle all the goddamn nautiloids up in his business.

cjohnstonbioart:

Helicoprion and Nautiloids

Sharks have existed for millions of years. They are extremely important to their local ecosystems as they help to keep fish populations in check. Today there are approximately 400 known species of sharks. Sadly, many species of sharks are facing the threat of extinction due to overfishing. For more information about sharks, their history, and conservation efforts to save them, check out: http://www.sharksavers.org/en/home/

Created with 3ds Max, ZBrush, After Effects, and Photoshop.

This shark looks like he just can’t handle all the goddamn nautiloids up in his business.

(via scientificillustration)

The man who paints the clouds on the sky.

The man who paints the clouds on the sky.

This guy’s having a really rough time.

This guy’s having a really rough time.

Nibbler’s a pretty cool guy.

s-c-i-guy:

Viruses Reconsidered
"The discovery of more and more viruses of record-breaking size calls for a reclassification of life on Earth."
The theory of evolution was first proposed based on visual observations of animals and plants. Then, in the latter half of the 19th century, the invention of the modern optical microscope helped scientists begin to systematically explore the vast world of previously invisible organisms, dubbed “microbes” by the late, great Louis Pasteur, and led to a rethinking of the classification of living things.
In the mid-1970s, based on the analysis of the ribosomal genes of these organisms, Carl Woese and others proposed a classification that divided living organisms into three domains: eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea. (See “Discovering Archaea, 1977,” The Scientist, March 2014) Even though viruses were by that time visible using electron microscopes, they were left off the tree of life because they did not possess the ribosomal genes typically used in phylogenetic analyses. And viruses are still largely considered to be nonliving biomolecules—a characterization spurred, in part, by the work of 1946 Nobel laureate Wendell Meredith Stanley, who in 1935 succeeded in crystallizing the tobacco mosaic virus. Even after crystallization, the virus maintained its biological properties, such as its ability to infect cells, suggesting to Stanley that the virus could not be truly alive.
Recently, however, the discovery of numerous giant virus species—with dimensions and genome sizes that rival those of many microbes—has challenged these views. In 2003, my colleagues and I announced the discovery of Mimivirus, a parasite of amoebae that researchers had for years considered a bacterium. With a diameter of 0.4 micrometers (μm) and a 1.2-megabase-pair DNA genome, the virus defied the predominant notion that viruses could never exceed 0.2 μm. Since then, a number of other startlingly large viruses have been discovered, most recently two Pandoraviruses in July 2013, also inside amoebas. Those viruses harbor genomes of 1.9 million and 2.5 million bases, and for more than 15 years had been considered parasitic eukaryotes that infected amoebas.
Now, with the advent of whole-genome sequencing, researchers are beginning to realize that most organisms are in fact chimeras containing genes from many different sources—eukaryotic, prokaryotic, and viral alike—leading us to rethink evolution, especially the extent of gene flow between the visible and microscopic worlds. Genomic analysis has, for example, suggested that eukaryotes are the result of ancient interactions between bacteria and archaea. In this context, viruses are becoming more widely recognized as shuttles of genetic material, with metagenomic studies suggesting that the billions of viruses on Earth harbor more genetic information than the rest of the living world combined. These studies point to viruses being at least as critical in the evolution of life as all the other organisms on Earth.
Read More

s-c-i-guy:

Viruses Reconsidered

"The discovery of more and more viruses of record-breaking size calls for a reclassification of life on Earth."

The theory of evolution was first proposed based on visual observations of animals and plants. Then, in the latter half of the 19th century, the invention of the modern optical microscope helped scientists begin to systematically explore the vast world of previously invisible organisms, dubbed “microbes” by the late, great Louis Pasteur, and led to a rethinking of the classification of living things.

In the mid-1970s, based on the analysis of the ribosomal genes of these organisms, Carl Woese and others proposed a classification that divided living organisms into three domains: eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea. (See “Discovering Archaea, 1977,” The Scientist, March 2014) Even though viruses were by that time visible using electron microscopes, they were left off the tree of life because they did not possess the ribosomal genes typically used in phylogenetic analyses. And viruses are still largely considered to be nonliving biomolecules—a characterization spurred, in part, by the work of 1946 Nobel laureate Wendell Meredith Stanley, who in 1935 succeeded in crystallizing the tobacco mosaic virus. Even after crystallization, the virus maintained its biological properties, such as its ability to infect cells, suggesting to Stanley that the virus could not be truly alive.

Recently, however, the discovery of numerous giant virus species—with dimensions and genome sizes that rival those of many microbes—has challenged these views. In 2003, my colleagues and I announced the discovery of Mimivirus, a parasite of amoebae that researchers had for years considered a bacterium. With a diameter of 0.4 micrometers (μm) and a 1.2-megabase-pair DNA genome, the virus defied the predominant notion that viruses could never exceed 0.2 μm. Since then, a number of other startlingly large viruses have been discovered, most recently two Pandoraviruses in July 2013, also inside amoebas. Those viruses harbor genomes of 1.9 million and 2.5 million bases, and for more than 15 years had been considered parasitic eukaryotes that infected amoebas.

Now, with the advent of whole-genome sequencing, researchers are beginning to realize that most organisms are in fact chimeras containing genes from many different sources—eukaryotic, prokaryotic, and viral alike—leading us to rethink evolution, especially the extent of gene flow between the visible and microscopic worlds. Genomic analysis has, for example, suggested that eukaryotes are the result of ancient interactions between bacteria and archaea. In this context, viruses are becoming more widely recognized as shuttles of genetic material, with metagenomic studies suggesting that the billions of viruses on Earth harbor more genetic information than the rest of the living world combined. These studies point to viruses being at least as critical in the evolution of life as all the other organisms on Earth.

Read More

(via scientificillustration)

colchrishadfield:

Vision of space travel from 100 years ago, guessing 83 days to the Moon. Even then we saw that engines are the key.

colchrishadfield:

Vision of space travel from 100 years ago, guessing 83 days to the Moon. Even then we saw that engines are the key.

(via scientificillustration)

fuckyeahdinoart:

Ankylosaurus by *PhillGonzo


This is freaking cool.

fuckyeahdinoart:

Ankylosaurus by *PhillGonzo

This is freaking cool.

(via fuckyeahdinoart)

humanoidhistory:

Vintage NASA concept art illustrating Skylab with the Command/Service Module docking with the Multiple Docking Adapter.
(Marshall Spaceflight Center/Department of Defense)

humanoidhistory:

Vintage NASA concept art illustrating Skylab with the Command/Service Module docking with the Multiple Docking Adapter.

(Marshall Spaceflight Center/Department of Defense)

(via scientificillustration)